A Zen Master’s Advice On Coping With Trump | HuffPost

“The Huffington Post recently interviewed a nun and a monk at Nhat Hanh’s Plum Village monastery in France, to ask what advice they would give to activists who want to take action during Trump’s presidency.

Sister Peace, who previously worked in the office of the mayor of Washington, says action must be inspired by a deep-rooted sense of love.

“If we can be strong in ourselves, then we could offer a resistance that is nonviolent,” she said. “But that means that we ourselves are at a place where we can have that recognition and we can offer that to another. And that is a great, great source of love and having the other feel they’re being recognized and listened to and embraced.”

She says that those who are passionate about taking action should learn from the nonviolent approach of the civil rights movement.

Referring to the 1965 march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama, during which marchers remained passive despite being chased and beaten, she said: “They were taught how to be quiet, how to be still, how not to resist and fight back no matter what happened.” Continue reading A Zen Master’s Advice On Coping With Trump | HuffPost

“…A lot of adults in institutions have some pretty cynical prejudices about teenagers. Both the criminal justice system and the schools, unfortunately there are many parallels. [People] process and look at the incident as the focus, it [Restorative Justice] allows for that person to be seen as more than just that incident… That’s communicated with circles and mediation, it gives a young person a chance to say I’m not just the person who did that [broke a rule], I’m also this [the family breadwinner], this [caretaker to my grandparent who raises me], and this [a student with a 4.0 who wants to be an architect-for example] and it gives other people the chance to say it about them on their behalf. -Rochelle Arms”

This episode of Alert, Aware, Mindful includes the story where Elle gets schooled and takes a hard look at the deterioration of intimacy through the culture of “busyness.” Featured is Rochelle Arms, who will be detailing her work with the Peace Institute in New York City and with Restorative Justice in communities, schools, and the criminal court systems. Our Call to action segment honors the … Continue reading “…A lot of adults in institutions have some pretty cynical prejudices about teenagers. Both the criminal justice system and the schools, unfortunately there are many parallels. [People] process and look at the incident as the focus, it [Restorative Justice] allows for that person to be seen as more than just that incident… That’s communicated with circles and mediation, it gives a young person a chance to say I’m not just the person who did that [broke a rule], I’m also this [the family breadwinner], this [caretaker to my grandparent who raises me], and this [a student with a 4.0 who wants to be an architect-for example] and it gives other people the chance to say it about them on their behalf. -Rochelle Arms”

Global Citizen

Very heartfelt speech focused on connecting with women around the world. Jolie plainly says that she doesn’t know why she was chosen for the life she leads, but she acknowledges how privileged it is and how we need to see how connected we are. Moving speech by Jolie who recently was appointed as visiting professor at London School of Economics Centre for Women, Security and Peace. … Continue reading Global Citizen

Virginia is finally giving felons like me the right to vote. We deserve it. – The Washington Post

” I have never voted. By the time I was 18, I had a felony shoplifting conviction, which meant that I forever lost my right to vote in Virginia. I never had a chance. Not that I cared about voting at 18. I started getting into trouble very young — running away from serious issues at home at age 12, drinking, smoking weed. I had … Continue reading Virginia is finally giving felons like me the right to vote. We deserve it. – The Washington Post

A Black princess who saves herself and exposes princess culture? Kids and adults say “Yes!” — Embrace Race — Medium

An interview with Jeremy Whitley about his race-positive, gender-bending, subversive series for kids, Princeless Source: A Black princess who saves herself and exposes princess culture? Kids and adults say “Yes!” — Embrace Race — Medium Continue reading A Black princess who saves herself and exposes princess culture? Kids and adults say “Yes!” — Embrace Race — Medium

“If we could read the secret history of our enemies,” Henry Wadsworth Longfellow said, “we should see sorrow and suffering enough to disarm all hostility.” Here’s a true fact: On November 6, 1963, when she was 18, Laura Bush ran a stop sign in Midland, Texas and crashed into a Chevy, killing the 17-year-old driver, Mike Douglas, who happened to be a friend of hers … Continue reading

Elle Cast 2.1 – Welcome Back

Welcome back to Alert, Aware Mindful. It has been a topsy turvy few months. Listen to hear about some of my revelations while away from the podcast. There are also some changes ahead and a whole new take on the broadcast. We have quite a few interesting interviews on the way this year. Take some time it’s less than 30 minutes, 2 of which are … Continue reading Elle Cast 2.1 – Welcome Back

Reposting* Elle Cast

I wanted to repost this episode with Philip Montgomery. We are discussing his job working with homeless Chicago LGBT youth. Mr. Montgomery also talks about working with youth who experience survival sex to support themselves. Philip is able to capture the poignancy of the situations but is also really, really funny.  It’s a good time! Check both parts one and two. Continue reading Reposting* Elle Cast

Meet Haben Girma, Harvard Law’s first deaf-blind graduate

Haben Girma was born deaf-blind but she had access to opportunities afforded by the Americans with Disabilities Act. Girma is Harvard Law School’s first deaf-blind graduate and her academic achievements have catapulted her advocacy career, fighting for the rights of people with disabilities Source: Meet Haben Girma, Harvard Law’s first deaf-blind graduate Continue reading Meet Haben Girma, Harvard Law’s first deaf-blind graduate